Everything you need to know about eggs


A 2005 study in The Journal of Neurobiology of Aging found that dietary eggs (including the yolk) improved memory and mood in elderly men and women.

Eggs also contain lutein, a compound linked with healthy eyesight. A 2005 study from Tufts University suggests that eating one egg daily can significantly reduce your risk of suffering age-related macular degeneration, one of the leading causes of blindness in older adults.

Recipe idea: Herb frittata with tomatoes and cheese

A bowl of fruit

5 large eggs; 1/2 cup roughly chopped mixed fresh herbs (try rosemary, oregano, or thyme); 1 clove garlic; 1 cup cherry or grape tomatoes; 1/2 cup grated cheese (try Cheddar, Parmesan, feta, or goat)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a medium skillet over moderate heat, melt 2 tablespoons of butter. Add herbs and garlic and saute for about 3 minutes. Stir in tomatoes and cook another minute or so.

Meanwhile, in a medium bowl whisk eggs until foamy. Pour into skillet with tomatoes and herbs. Cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally until eggs are just set but still moist on top. Sprinkle cheese over the frittata and bake for about 5 minutes until the cheese melts. Cut into wedges; serve hot or at room temperature.

1 serving: 276 calories; 13 grams protein; 9 grams carbohydrates; 1 gram fiber; 20 grams fat (8 grams saturated); 389 milligrams cholesterol

Benefits:

A plate of food on a table

– Contains Choline, which is good for memory.

– Egg yolks contain lutein, which is good for eyesight.

– Eggs also contain Lecithin, which is good for your heart and cholesterol levels.

– Contains Vitamin A, which is good for the eyes, getting rid of infections, and keeping your skin healthy.

– Contain Biotin (vitamin H), which contributes to normal hair growth and cell renewal.

– Contain Folate (vitamin B9), which protects against anemia and low blood levels of folate.

– Contain Vitamin D, which helps in the absorption of calcium and phosphorus, and contributes to normal bone formation.

– Contains Protein, which is essential for tissue repair and growth.

– Contains Vitamin B12, which contributes to normal red blood cell formation.

– Eggs also contain Riboflavin (vitamin B2), which is required for energy production and metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins. It also helps in the process of tissue repair.

Beneficial Nutrients Per 100g: –

Protein 11 g; – Carbohydrates 2.5 g; – Dietary Fibre- Nil; – Fat 39 g, of which Saturated Fat 19 g; – Cholesterol 513 mg.

Conclusion:

Eggs are packed with nutrients, including choline–a B vitamin that’s used in the production of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter involved with memory. A 2005 study in The Journal of Neurobiology of Aging found that dietary eggs (including the yolk) improved memory and mood in elderly men and women. Eggs also contain lutein, a compound linked with healthy eyesight. A 2005 study from Tufts University suggests that eating one egg daily can significantly reduce your risk of suffering age-related macular degeneration, one of the leading causes of blindness in older adults.

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